Transition to Adulthood for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities

December 28, 2015

adults with disabilities

Planning for the “Cliff” For many teens, the transition to adulthood will begin as they graduate from high school and move onto college or their first job. It’s a time of great excitement and a big milestone in a young person’s life. For those with developmental disabilities and their families, this transition is an even more immense and monumental milestone in their lives. Not only are they experiencing similar feelings of excitement and anxiousness, but they are also embarking on a change that will transform the services and support they have come to expect, as well as their relationships and…Read More

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Sensory Overstimulation during the Holiday Season

December 18, 2015

Sensory Overstimulation during the Holiday Season

The holiday season can be a joyous time of celebration with family and friends. It can also be a very difficult time for children with sensory processing disorders. Parents often struggle to find a balance between traditional holiday celebrations and meeting the unique sensory needs of their child. It is important to remember that the holidays are a time to cherish one another and to enjoy being together. Adapting celebrations in order to ensure your child with sensory needs is included and happy will guarantee the entire family has the chance to experience the magic of the holiday season. Planning…Read More

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The Power of Choice

December 15, 2015

The Power of Choice

Do you remember the days when airlines used to offer you a small hot meal on flights that occurred around dinner time? Do you remember sitting in your seat and hearing the stewardess offering a choice to the people in front of you?  From three rows ahead you hear, “Sir, would you like the mystery meat or the notorious noodles?”  Instantly, you say to yourself, “I’m going for the notorious noodles,” and you begin to psych yourself up about how you’re going to dig into those noodles. When the stewardess gets to you, she says, “Sir, I’m sorry to inform…Read More

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Holoprosencephaly Awareness & Therapy Treatments

November 28, 2015

Holoprosencephaly Awareness

A Congenital Brain Disorder Holoprosencephaly is a congenital brain disorder caused by a failure of an embryo’s forebrain to divide to form bilateral cerebral hemispheres (the left and right halves of the brain), causing defects in the development of the face and in brain structure and function. Also referred to as HPE, this brain malformation can range from mild to severe and is classified into four types: Middle Interhemispheric Variant (MIHV) is where the middle of the brain (posterior frontal and parietal lobes) are not well separated. Lobar, considered mild, is where the brain is divided and there are some…Read More

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FOXG1 Awareness Month

November 25, 2015

FOXG1 syndrome

In 2013, The International FOXG1 Foundation was founded by parents of children with FOXG1 – a severe neurological condition characterized by seizures, the inability to control body movements, and a lack of speech. The goal of the Foundation is to build awareness of the FOXG1 condition, provide support and inspiration to families with affected children, and raise money for research. Infants and young children with FOXG1 syndrome will often have feeding problems, sleep disturbances, seizures, irritability, and excessive crying. The condition is also characterized by limited communication and social interaction, including poor eye contact and a near absence of speech…Read More

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ADHD – Unmasking the Myths

November 9, 2015

Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)

Everyone has the occasional difficulty sitting still, paying attention, or controlling impulsive behavior. However, for some, those feelings are not occasional and instead the problem is much more persistent and interferes with their daily lives. Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) affects more than 15 million people in the US alone. It is one of the most common neurobehavioral disorders characterized by developmentally inappropriate impulsivity, inattention, and in some cases, hyperactivity. It is usually diagnosed first in childhood and often lasts into adulthood. ADHD does not discriminate and affects people of every age and background. The mission of ADHD Awareness is to educate…Read More

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The Components of an IEP: Part 2

November 4, 2015

Cyberbullying

The Components of an IEP: What are they and why do you need them for your child with a learning disability? Part Two Of A Two Part Series Part 2, The “Main Course” of the IEP. These components are designed to lay the structure for educational services as well as to provide a method for evaluating and monitoring progress. Annual Goals A statement of measurable annual goals, including academic and functional goals designed to: Meet the child’s needs that result from the child’s disability to enable the child to be involved in and make progress in the general education curriculum….Read More

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The Components of an IEP: Part 1

November 2, 2015

Preparing for School

The Components of an IEP: What are they and why do you need them for your child with a learning disability? Part One Of A Two Part Series The Individualized Education Program (IEP) is a written document that is developed for each eligible child with a disability.  IDEIA (2004) federal regulations specify that school districts must develop, review, and revise the IEP for each child. Each part of the IEP assists school teams in putting together a plan/program that is individualized per student, in order to offer a free and appropriate education. The article is designed to give a summary regarding the…Read More

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Down Syndrome Strong – A Note to Epic Health Services

October 30, 2015

Down Syndrome Awareness

Hi! My name is Alexis Solis and I have Down Syndrome. My parents tell me that I am a miracle baby and a blessing from God. When I was born, my parents did not know that I had Down Syndrome and I had to have several tests completed all over my body. After my diagnosis was confirmed, I still needed over 20 surgeries; two of them were receiving a tracheostomy and a gastrostomy button (G-button). I had my trach removed 5 years ago and I breathe on my own now. I don’t remember the last time I needed oxygen assistance….Read More

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Halloween Tips for Kids with Autism Spectrum Disorders

October 30, 2015

Autism Spectrum Disorders

Halloween Tips for Kids with Autism Spectrum Disorders Halloween is an exciting holiday for kids, but it may offer certain challenges for children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Preparation and planning can help you stay stress-free. Whether this is your child’s first Halloween or not, here are some ideas to help you and your child enjoy the holiday. Before Halloween: Tips for Kids with ASD Create a visual story of what Halloween may be like for your child, with some pictures or drawings. This will help your child prepare for the day’s activities. Try on costumes before If the costume…Read More

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