October 10, 2016

Homework TipsProviding high-quality, personalized education to children with special needs is important and necessary. It helps these children reach their potential and gives them opportunities that all children deserve. While your child’s teachers may be amazing, the learning doesn’t stop when the bell rings. When your child gets home, he or she will inevitably face every child’s nightmare: homework. Helping your child with special needs with his or her homework can be difficult at times, but don’t lose hope. With some organization and routine, you can experience that amazing moment when your child suddenly gets it.

Helping your child with special needs with his or her homework can be difficult at times, but don’t lose hope. With some organization and routine, you can experience that amazing moment when your child suddenly gets it. The light in their eyes when a concept clicks will be worth all the struggle. Here are some strategies you can try to make homework time less stressful.

Get The Homework Organized

Staying organized will help keep you from staying up late with your child finishing a project that was assigned two weeks ago and is due tomorrow. Either add homework due dates to your family calendar or keep a separate homework calendar. Make it part of your routine to add assignments to the calendar each day, if necessary.

It’s All About the Environment

Set up a specific place for your child to complete homework. Try to set it up away from distractions, such as television and other children. Make sure the space is only for your child with special needs and is not shared. This way, your child can take ownership of the space and leave the materials ready to use.

Know Your Child’s Style

Albert Einstein said, “Everyone is a genius. But if you judge a fish by its ability to climb a tree, it will live its whole life believing that it is stupid.” Everyone learns differently, and trying to learn in a style that doesn’t work for you will only cause frustration. Try to help your child in a way that works for them.

If your child prefers to work independently, allow him or her the space to do so. If he or she prefers visual communication, adjust accordingly. It may take some trial and error to figure out what works best, but when you find the best strategy, it will all be worth it.

Don’t Be Afraid to Ask for Help

Your child’s educators are there to help. Don’t be afraid to ask for tips when you are in need. Reaching out does not make you less of a parent. In fact, using all available resources to help your child succeed makes you a great parent!

If you are struggling to help your child with special need with homework, take a deep breath. Try some of these strategies, and you can be on your way to helping your child succeed.